ForeFlight 7 is Here. Faster Planning, Faster Downloads, and More.

With this release, planning gets even better with a more advanced Procedure Advisor and a dramatically improved navigation database that enables visual preview of SIDs, STARs, approaches, and pattern entries. Downloads are significantly faster and use less disk space. Cabin Altitude Advisor leverages integrated pressure sensors to alert you when things don’t seem quite right. Support for Apple Watch gives you at-a-glance weather, flight instruments, and timers. Our new web-based flight planning system delivers an industry first Web-to-Panel flight planning experience for supported avionics. ForeFlight Mobile version 7.0 is available now on the App Store.

More Efficient Route Planning with Departure, Arrival, and Instrument Procedure Preview 

Our Procedure Advisor tool now allows you to visually preview arrivals, departures, approach procedures, VFR traffic patterns, and Search and Rescue patterns prior to adding them to your route. Procedure preview makes it easy to see how various procedures enter and exit a terminal area.

To use procedure preview, enter a departure and destination in the Route Editor, then tap the Procedure button in the upper right of the Edit view:

Procedure button

A preview window displays the available departures, arrivals, approaches, traffic patterns, and optionally, SAR patterns.

Choose a procedure type to preview.

In this example, tap on ‘Departure (19)’ to view the graphical display of departure procedures out of the Houston area:

Departure procedures out of the Houston area.

The preview begins with a broad overview of the selected airport and geographic guides that outline each direction served by a particular procedure. After selecting an arrival or departure, either in the list on the left or by tapping one on the Map, transitions can be previewed and selected before adding it to the route.

Procedure Advisor also allows you to preview instrument approaches, including a flag on the best wind runway based on the current METAR. Once an approach is selected you can preview different entry points on top of the plate itself. When you are done, simply tap Add to Route.

You can also preview different traffic pattern entries with Traffic Pattern Advisor. The preview flags the best wind runway based on the current METAR and the best side for different VFR pattern entries. Once you have finished adding items to your route, simply tap Close (on the upper right) or tap outside the preview window to hide the Procedure Advisor.

Procedure preview is available on the iPad to Basic and Pro subscribers.

Faster Downloads with Delta Downloads

With ForeFlight 7, we introduce faster and smaller downloads that use less disk space during cycle cross-over time. We call this Delta Downloads and the new system only delivers the ‘what changed’ data each month, resulting in a 70% to 90% reduction in download time without compromising chart quality. Delta Downloads includes terminal procedures, taxi charts, IFR and VFR charts, FAA A/FD, and Canada Flight Supplement data. As Delta Downloads rolls out, you will see the full benefit over the next couple of data cycles. As a customer, there is no action you need to take. Delta Downloads happens automatically for all subscribers.

Stay Safe at High Altitudes with Cabin Altitude Advisor

In the past year, hypoxia and depressurization have claimed pilot lives. We hope Cabin Altitude Advisor helps to prevent future accidents like these. Cabin Altitude Advisor takes advantage of the barometer sensor built-in to iPhone 6, iPhone 6 Plus, and iPad Air 2. The advisor alerts pilots when crossing through 12,000 feet MSL and 25,000 feet MSL. The audio and visual alert triggers once every 30 minutes for each altitude. Pressure Altitude is also available to display in the Instrument panel.

 

A New Look in the Downloads View

In the Downloads view, you will now see VFR charts (TACs and Sectionals) listed by chart name instead of by State.

New look in Downloads view.You can refer to a Chart legend for VFR chart coverage or simply use Pack to ensure that the charts you need for a trip are downloaded to your device.

ForeFlight on Your Wrist with Apple Watch

ForeFlight 7 introduces Apple Watch support, including weather at-a-glance, instruments, and timers.

ForeFlight Lands on Your Desktop

We are excited to announce that ForeFlight flight planning is coming to your web browser. ForeFlight Web Beta enables a full screen desktop experience, automatically syncs to ForeFlight Mobile, and offers seamless Web-to-Panel capabilities via ForeFlight Connect. Our Web-to-Panel concept is a first in flight planning, where web planning activity syncs to your mobile device and loads into the panel of supported avionics like Dynon SkyView.

ForeFlight Web Beta will initially be available to existing ForeFlight customers. We envision this as a very collaborative product development process with our customers. Features will evolve quickly with frequent releases, driven by our vision and by customer feedback. ForeFlight customers who are interested in this Beta program are invited to sign up at www.foreflight.com/web. Invitations to the Beta will be released in phases.

Bulletin: April 30 Data Updates

Data updates are now available to download for the April 30, 2015 – May 28, 2015 and April 30, 2015 – June 28, 2015 periods:

  • Airport and Navigation Database
  • ForeFlight Airport Diagrams
  • North American Obstacles
  • Documents, including the EAA AirVenture 2015 NOTAM

From the FAA:

  • VFR Charts and Terminal Area Charts
  • World Area Charts
  • High and Low Enroutes, Area Charts
  • Caribbean High and Low Enroutes, Area Charts
  • Ocean Planning Charts
  • Taxi Diagrams
  • Terminal Procedures
  • Airport/Facility Diagrams
  • Documents

An updated Terminal Procedures download for New York is also available for the April 2, 2015 – April 30, 2015 period to address a safety alert.

For our ForeFlight Mobile Pro Canada customers:

  • Taxi Diagrams
  • Terminal Procedures
  • High and Low Enroutes
  • Canada Flight Supplement
  • Documents

For our Military Flight Bag customers:

  • Georeferenced worldwide D-FLIP Terminal Procedures
  • Georeferenced worldwide D-FLIP Airport Diagrams
  • CSA High and Low Enroutes, Area Charts
  • PAA High and Low Enroutes, Area Charts
  • D-FLIP Publications such as Planning Change Notices, Area Planning Documents,
  • Chart Supplements, Enroute Change Notices, and Terminal Change Notices.
  • Airfield Qualification Program (AQP) diagrams
  • Airfield Suitability and Restrictions Report (Giant Report)
  • Airport/Facility Directory

All customers will be prompted to download these updates inside of ForeFlight Mobile.

A Layered Approach In ForeFlight

In addition to all of the other great features introduced in ForeFlight Mobile 6.8, we also enhanced the app to allow more layers to be displayed simultaneously on the Map view. Many of these layers are mutually exclusive of one another. That is, when you select a new layer, it will replace the current layer (if any) that was previously selected.  For instance, the app will not allow the Radar and Satellite layer to be displayed at the same time. Therefore, with the Radar layer on, selecting the Satellite layer will deselect and hide Radar layer.

Having this dependency certainly makes sense when selecting between many of the airport-specific layers such as Flight Category, Temperature and Ceiling just to name a few. That dependency hasn’t changed. However, the Pilot Weather Reports (PIREPs) and Lightning layers are not tied to an airport and can now be overlaid individually or together with any of the other Map layers.

Multiple Overlays on Map View

When viewing the Satellite layer, be sure to select Sky Coverage, PIREPs and Lightning for the most complete picture.

This was primarily done to allow users to select the satellite layer while also displaying Sky Coverage along with Lightning as discussed in this earlier blog post. Adding on the PIREPs layer will provide an even greater situational awareness of the weather occurring at any particular location as shown above. If you were to visit the Aviation Weather Center in Kansas City, Missouri, you will notice on the image below that they also make heavy use of overlays.

AWC Overlay Screen

Forecasters often overlay sky coverage and AIRMETs over the visible satellite image.

But if you really want to go crazy, you can select up to seven layers to be displayed at the same time as shown below.  But let’s not go crazy.

Everything Selected

Adding too many layers can render the Map view unreadable.

 

Automated Ceiling Reports

Every day pilots use surface observations to make many routine operational decisions before or during any particular flight. For example, as you approach an airport you have been trained to listen to the ground-to-air radio broadcast to determine the preferred landing runway based on the current wind direction. Or even before you are in radio coverage you may have been following the latest FIS-B METAR broadcast received by your Stratus and displayed in the ForeFlight Mobile app. Many of these observations come from automated systems. So it is critical that pilots at all experience levels understand how these systems collect and process the weather data especially those automated ceiling reports.

Approach-LNS

Listen to the ground-to-air radio broadcast when approaching an airport.

The two primary automated observing systems deployed at many airports throughout the United States includes the Automated Surface Observing System (ASOS) and the Automated Weather Observation System (AWOS). These automated systems like the one shown here consist of a collection of electronic sensors that measure the environment, and then process the data to create an observation once every minute. Even though these automated systems create a completely new observation every minute, they must have adequate sensor samples to develop an accurate observation. In order to provide a representative observation at an airport, the automated hardware must continuously collect the sensor’s real-time data over a period of time. The automated system applies an algorithm to the collected data to extrapolate the weather to cover a wider area.

METAR-ForeFlight

Get the latest observation from ForeFlight Mobile before departing.

This is especially important when considering the observation for sky cover and cloud base height. When approaching an airport, for example, pilots don’t necessarily want to know what’s happening instantly over the sensor since it may not always be representative of the sky condition throughout the airport’s terminal area. Most importantly, it might vary quite a bit between reports.

Automated systems employ an upward-pointing laser beam ceilometer to determine sky cover and cloud height such as the sensor shown here. The cloud height indicator, for instance, transmits a little over 9,000 pulses in 12 seconds, but it’s not these individual samples that are used for the observation. Instead, this data is collected over a period of 30 minutes before a ceiling or sky cover observation is considered acceptable and broadcast to the pilot. So the ceiling report your see on ForeFlight or the one you hear from the ground-to-air radio broadcast is based on a sampling of 30 minutes of data and not the most recent sensor sample taken.

Airports-View-METAR

Automated report in the Airports View in ForeFlight Mobile.

Based on studies, 30 minutes of data provides a fairly reasonable description of sky conditions. This means that the system will detect and process all the clouds (if any) passing over the sensor in the past 30 minutes. To account for the latest sky conditions, the result is biased by counting the last 10 minutes of data twice, a technique referred to as double weighting. Using the last 30 minutes of data in this way will allow the system to determine the height and sky cover included in the surface observation and this becomes a reasonable estimate of the sky conditions that is valid over a three to five statute mile radius around the airport.

Keep in mind that these automated systems have a few important limitations. For instance, automated systems can only report clouds that are below 12,000 feet AGL. This means that an overcast cloud deck at 15,000 feet AGL will be reported as clear. Effectively, a clear sky report from an automated station means the sky is free of clouds below 12,000 feet AGL even though it still may be an overcast day.

Tower-LNS

Towered airport with a trained observer present.

While many high-impact airports throughout the U.S. still rely on a trained weather observer to construct the routine or special observation (SPECI), automated systems supply them with uniform and objective data for the observation. However, automated systems measure only the weather that passes directly through the sensor array so it is not able to report what’s happening outside the airport’s runway complex. Trained weather observers can certainly augment the observation to add these details such as clouds with bases above 12,000 AGL. By the way, the NWS is looking to extend the capabilities of the ceilometer to automatically report clouds above 12,000 feet, but don’t hold your breath; it may take several years before such a solution becomes available.

Bulletin: April 13 Data Updates

Data updates are available for the April 2, 2015 – April 30, 2015 period.

New Terminal Procedures downloads are available for Idaho, Montana, Oregon, Washington and Wyoming. These downloads replace the Diverse Vector Area information for KPDX and address an FAA Safety Alert.

We have also updated the Pilot’s Guide to ForeFlight Mobile in our document catalog.

All customers will be prompted to download these updates inside of ForeFlight Mobile.

Customer Notice: Issue with Apple iOS 8.3 and External Bluetooth GPS Receivers

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For more information, see Update: iOS 8.4 Expected To Resolve GPS Accessory Compatibility Issue

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We have learned of an issue with Apple iOS 8.3 that affects some early model Bluetooth GPS accessories, such as the Dual GPS 150 and Bad Elf Pro. When used with iOS 8.3, position information from these accessories may not be delivered to iOS applications, including ForeFlight Mobile.

Stratus and Bad Elf Pro+ devices are not affected. Our friends at Bad Elf have escalated the issue to Apple for resolution.

As a workaround, customers with Wi-Fi + Cellular iPads who have upgraded to iOS 8.3 can disconnect their Bluetooth accessories and rely on the iPad’s internal GPS or Stratus. Customers with Wi-Fi only iPads who have upgraded to iOS 8.3 will need to wait for a resolution, upgrade to a newer GPS accessory, or connect to a Stratus.

We will keep you updated. If you rely on one of these early model Bluetooth GPS accessories, we do not recommend that you upgrade your Apple devices to iOS 8.3.

ForeFlight for Apple Watch. Coming Soon.

ForeFlight for Apple Watch

Apple Watch is the first product Apple has designed to be worn and represents a new chapter in the relationship pilots have with technology. It brings a fresh opportunity for ForeFlight designers and developers to deliver new experiences that make interacting with ForeFlight Mobile and important flight information easier and more personal. We are excited to share with you this preview of ForeFlight for Apple Watch.

ForeFlight for Apple Watch weather and instruments.

At-a-Glance Weather and Time

With a flick of the wrist, ForeFlight displays nearby flight conditions, as well as local and zulu time using the Apple Watch Glances feature. Know when flight conditions are above minimums and forget having to do local to zulu time conversions in your head!

ADS-B Weather to Your Wrist

With a Stratus on board and connected to iPhone, ADS-B weather is delivered right to ForeFlight for Apple Watch. In flight and on the ground, easily view current METARs for airports in your recents and favorites lists.ForeFlight for Apple Watch Instruments view.

Customizable Flight Instruments

A customizable dashboard of flight instruments helps you keep track of information like ETE, ETA, distance to destination, track, ground speed, GPS altitude, and more. Configure the instrument layout to suit your preferences.

Flight Notifications and Timers

Apple Watch delivers the ForeFlight flight notifications that you are used to, but in a more convenient way. Get a discreet wrist tap as soon as an expected route clearance is issued. Keep tabs on total flight time or timed approaches in the Timers view.

ForeFlight for Apple Watch Timers view.Get Ready

An iPhone 5 or later running iOS 8.2 or higher is required to run ForeFlight for Apple Watch. The iPhone installs supported applications on Apple Watch and manages communications between the devices. Without an iPhone, you cannot install Apple Watch applications at this time.

 

 

Pre-orders begin today and Apple Watch goes on sale April 24th.

ForeFlight for Apple Watch with iPhone.

Fooling Around With Convective Wind Shear

Most pilots equate wind shear to turbulence or convection. Certainly some forms of wind shear are indeed turbulent and convection can also induce dangerous wind shear. If the wind shear occurs close to the surface when the aircraft is landing or departing, it may be in excess of the inertial capabilities of the aircraft making it difficult for the pilot to recover resulting in an accident that is often fatal. But don’t be fooled; some of the most dangerous wind shear situations come out of rather benign-looking convective environments.

Moist low-level outflow from a thunderstorm.

Moist low-level outflow from a thunderstorm.

Perhaps the most dangerous wind shear occurs in a convective downburst where downdrafts in thunderstorms have been estimated to be greater than 100 miles per hour. These high-speed winds strike the surface and spread out creating a gust front that can also be very dangerous especially if it occurs when landing or departing. When that downburst occurs in a very small area spatially (about 2 miles) it is referred to as a microburst similar to the one in this image. Most microbursts are ephemeral lasting no more than five minutes in most cases.

At this point in time, several large turbojet aircraft have succumb to the forces associated with a microburst. The one that is especially memorable is Delta Airlines Flight 191 that encountered a microburst on approach to the Dallas Fort Worth International Airport (KDFW) in 1985. Delta Flight 191 didn’t fly through or under an intense supercell thunderstorm as you might imagine. In fact, a thunderstorm with a cloud base of nearly 10,000 feet was the culprit. High-base convection with a heavy rain signature should be of particular concern to pilots since they signal a deep mixed layer with a high lapse rate and plenty of precipitation to fuel a strong downdraft. Pilots can be fooled because high-based convection does not seem particularly threatening (especially to pilots flying large turbojet aircraft) which makes them even more likely to stumble into the path of a downburst or microburst.

Here’s a quote from a paper written by Captain William W. Melvin entitled Wind Shear Revisited, Air Line Pilot Magazine, Nov 1994.

Many pilots have been trained to avoid large supercell-type thunderstorms in the belief that this will prevent encounters with microbursts. Yet no evidence exists that any of the known microburst encounters have occurred in supercell storms. Dr. Ted Fujita and Dr. Fernando Caracena recognized authorities in this field have repeatedly emphasized that microbursts are frequently generated from benign-appearing cells. Many “experts” who disagree with Drs. Fujita and Caracena have emphasized the supercell storms with warnings of dangers of gust fronts. These so-called experts are leading pilots down the primrose path for microburst encounters.

In a high-based thunderstorm there’s typically an extremely dry environment between the cloud base and the surface. Initially, little or no rain may reach the surface. As the rain falls out of the cloud into this very dry atmosphere it evaporates quickly which causes a cooling effect relative to the air around the precipitation. Such cooling makes the air much denser, and therefore negatively buoyant, effectively creating a very intense downburst with winds that may exceed hurricane force, even approaching the speeds found in a weak to moderate tornado.

The next time you see what appears to be a very inviting situation in and around active convection, think twice about departing or making that approach to land. Microbursts can happen quickly before any visual cue may exist. Especially avoid areas where you see a circular ring of dust at the surface that may be curled around the edges or any kind of bulge (piling up) of precipitation at the bottom of an evolving rain shaft. These are all characteristics of a intense downdraft, microburst or gust front.

Expanded Taxi Chart Coverage, Taxi Chart Improvements Land in ForeFlight Mobile 6.8

We are pleased to announce that ForeFlight Mobile version 6.8 is now available for download on the App Store! This update focuses on improving airport surface operations with more taxi chart coverage and more information on taxi charts for improved guidance. A new ownship setting makes compliance easy for customers operating under the guidance of FAA AC 120-76C. Version 6.8 also moves the app to a new minimum level of iOS support, paving the way to better product efficiency and more feature capability in the future.

FBOs on Taxi Charts

Taxiing to the FBO just got easier—over 2700 FBO locations are now mapped on both FAA and ForeFlight Airport Diagrams for better ground-based taxi guidance. When coupled with ownship display capability in ForeFlight Mobile Pro, you can easily see where your aircraft is in relation to the FBO. We continue to add more FBO markers with each Business Directory update.

(Edited 4/13/15: ForeFlight Mobile version 6.8.1 is now available on the App Store and resolves the issue where FBO markers were not displaying on ForeFlight Mobile Basic accounts.)

FBOs on Airport Diagram

FBO markers shown on the airport diagram for Houston’s Hobby Airport.

While viewing a taxi chart, tap on any FBO marker to see detailed information, including photos, fuel prices, contact information, and more. FBO markers will appear on taxi charts within the Plates view and also when displaying a taxi chart on top of the moving map.

FBOs on Airport Diagrams detail view.

Tap on the FBO marker to reveal detailed location information.

You can choose to show or hide the FBO markers using the FBO button on the Plates view:

Turn FBO overlay on or off in the Plates view.

Turn FBO overlay on or off in the Plates view.

Or on the Maps view, tap anywhere on the taxi chart to open the pop-over menu and toggle the Show FBOs button ON or OFF:

Turn FBO overlay on or off in the Maps view.

Turn FBO overlay on or off in the Maps view.

If you are an FBO and would like to place your marker, login to your ForeFlight Manage account or contact directory@foreflight.com to set up an account.

FBOs on Airport Diagrams is available to Basic and Pro subscribers; ownship position on geo-referenced airport diagrams is a Pro feature.

Expanded Taxi Chart Coverage

We continue to invest in expanding our taxi chart coverage, providing taxi charts for airports not mapped by the FAA. As of this release, we have added more than 1,700 ForeFlight taxi charts—more than tripling the coverage provided by the FAA alone! Our airport mapping team continues to expand ForeFlight’s library, giving you more coverage at more airports. Combined with the new FBO display on taxi charts, finding FBOs at airports is easier than ever.

Easy Ownship Compliance Support for Operations Under FAA AC 120-76C Guidance

Ownship depiction with runway proximity advisor.

Approval for ownship display on airport diagrams is a huge safety enhancement for Part 135 and 121 operators.

ForeFlight now makes it easier for our certificated FAA Part 91F, 91K, 121, 125 and 135 customers to comply with ownship display limitations as defined in FAA AC 120-76C operational guidance for use of electronic flight bags.

These operators are limited to using ownship depiction during airport surface operations and at less than 80 knots ground speed.

To access the setting, navigate to the More > Settings view, then scroll down to Preferences and tap on Enable Ownship. The ownship setting options include: Always, Never, and Limited. Limited mode automatically applies the speed-restricted display function as described in the Advisory Circular. Once airborne, the ownship display icon is automatically removed from view. 

New ownship setting for easy compliance.

New ‘Limited’ ownship setting makes it easy to comply with FAA AC-120-76C guidance.

If your flight operation is not taking advantage of ownship display on taxi diagrams, we have the tools and resources to help you get going. Email sales@foreflight.com for more information.

ForeFlight 6.8 requires iOS 8 or higher

Please note that ForeFlight Mobile 6.8 requires iOS 8 or higher. By moving to iOS 8 as the minimum supported iOS version, we can deliver new features enabled by the Apple update, deliver smaller application downloads, improve energy efficiency, improve support for devices like the iPhone 6 Plus, and deliver faster application performance. 

If you would like to take advantage of the new features in ForeFlight Mobile 6.8 or later, you will first need to update your device to the current iOS 8.x version. Apple posted this helpful article with instructions on how to update your iOS device to iOS 8.

For those of you running Apple iOS 7.x or earlier versions, you will still be able to use your current version of ForeFlight Mobile. After ForeFlight Mobile 6.8 is released, if you need to reinstall ForeFlight on an existing device you can download the last compatible version of ForeFlight Mobile from the App Store. If you have any questions, please contact us at team@foreflight.com.

The only device that is not capable of upgrading to iOS 8 that is currently also supported by iOS 7 (the current minimum iOS requirement for ForeFlight Mobile) is iPhone 4.

Blue skies!

Where Are They Now: 2014 EAA ForeFlight Scholarship Winners

After naming our two recipients of the EAA ForeFlight Scholarship back in July, they wasted no time starting their aviation adventure. We caught up with Megan and Jacob recently and asked them a few questions about their flight training so far. Sit back, buckle up, we’re going to flight school!

IMG_3284

Megan Kerstein
With more interests than hours in her day, Megan set the bar high with lofty goals in mind for her pilot license. Becoming a flight surgeon or aviation medicine physician and volunteering for Angel Flight and Young Eagles were just a few things on her list to combine her two passions. Now, as a full time college student, Megan has officially added flight training to her extracurricular activities. In mid-September, Megan began her flight training at Air Associates of Missouri in St. Louis and online ground school through the Cessna/King Schools training program.

What has been the most exciting thing so far in your flight training?
Megan: It’s been really exciting to see how I progress from week to week. My first few lessons the instructor helped me pre-flight the plane, and now I do it all by myself. I’ve also learned how to talk to air traffic control, which I was initially nervous about, but I’ve gotten much more comfortable with doing it.

Has there been anything unexpected or that you have been surprised by in your training?
Megan: I’ve been surprised with all the factors that go into making a flight–beyond simply getting in the plane with the instructor and heading up to the sky. There’s a lot of preflight planning to look into, weather to check (and keep checking), fuel to check, the aircraft itself which must be meticulously inspected prior to flight, FAA airspace rules to understand, etc. Some of these things I would never have thought of prior to taking flight lessons, but now I better understand the intricacies of all of the “behind-the-scenes” work that goes into making a safe flight.

What have you learned so far?
Megan: I have learned about slow flight, stall recovery maneuvers, landings, pre-flighting the airplane, Air Traffic Control communication, and weight and balance calculations. Flight lessons have also been a great way to learn more about the topography of St. Louis/Missouri. This has helped with VFR flying, since I now know markers I can follow to get back to the airport, such as following the Missouri River.

Overall Megan loves flight training: “I look forward to my weekly lessons and next semester my class schedule allows me to take lessons during the week, so I’ll probably fly a couple of times a week.” said Kerstein. She is looking forward to an upcoming sightseeing-oriented flight where they will fly by the St. Louis Arch, “which will be pretty cool.” Yes, very cool, Megan, and you are one step closer to becoming a licensed private pilot!

Jacob Solo-Millionaire
Jacob Rasmussen
Seventeen year old Jacob Rasmussen may not know exactly what he wants to do with his license, but he knows he wants to be in the air and that is just fine with us. Jacob searched carefully to find the perfect instructor—a decorated military pilot of 35 years who owns flight schools around the Washington area. Here’s what Jacob shared with us about his experience so far…

How did you select your flight training?
Jacob: When initially starting my search for a flight instructor, I wanted to make sure that I would be able to find just the right instructor to train with. I had hoped for someone with some form of military background. Through becoming more involved and establishing relationships within the aviation community, I was eventually able to find who I was looking for and became well acquainted with Don Karpen of Karpen Aviation. Don was a US Naval fighter pilot and Top Gun graduate. He has racked up well over 12,000 hours total time, with over 8,000 hours as an instructor. As soon as we met and I had an orientation flight, I knew he was the best choice.

Where are you in your training and what have you learned so far?
Jacob: I started with my first lesson on November 14, and since have completed 11 hours total time thus far, with 1.1 hours of it being soloing. Within those 11 hours, I have made 53 landings. I have completed approximately 2/3 of my ground school training and am absorbing all of what I learn very quickly. Being in command of an aircraft has taught me to become very assertive, not only in the airplane itself, but also on the ground and everyday life.

Has there been anything unexpected or that you have been surprised by in your training?
Jacob: The most surprising thing has to be how quick I took to the airplane. Through just a little application of knowledge and perseverance, it has become almost second nature to be defying gravity in an aluminum tube with a bucket seat, powered by a lawnmower engine. I am very appreciative of the opportunity ForeFlight has given me to have the ability to not only pursue my passion, but also be able to complete it in the very near future. Thank you ForeFlight!

Thanks for the update, Megan and Jacob! We will stay tuned for more.